When thyroid hormones don’t relieve depression

Also: Amazon reviews, recent podcast interviews, and the functional neurology conference (bottom of post) Depression is a common symptom of hypothyroidism, yet many people become frustrated when their thyroid hormone medication does not relieve depression. This is because the effects of hypothyroidism on the brain are more complicated than people realize and thyroid hormone medication…

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Got brain drain? Hashimoto’s and brain degeneration

If you’re managing your Hashimoto’s yet still waiting for your depression to lift and your memory to return, you could be suffering from the beginning of a brain breakdown. Scientists call it accelerated brain degeneration, and it’s critical you know about it. Many symptoms of brain decline overlap with Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism so that patients—and their…

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Brain not working? Read my new book

I am very proud to announce the release of my new brain book, Why Isn’t My Brain Working? At almost 600 pages and backed by more than 1,000 references, this book brings together the latest brain research to show you how to care for this most vital organ. The book is now available through Amazon…

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Iodine and Hashimoto’s

Iodine supplementation has become very popular in recent years, and with good reason. Iodine has been shown to be an effective therapy for such conditions as breast and uterine fibroids, breast cancer, and more. When it comes to Hashimoto’s, however, I oppose the use of iodine as you risk worsening your autoimmune thyroid condition. As…

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Eating gluten increases the need for thyroid hormones

A new study shows Hashimoto’s patients with symptomless celiac disease (i.e., no digestive complaints) require 49 percent more T4 to achieve the same TSH levels as non-celiac Hashimoto’s patients. After the patients followed a gluten-free diet for 11 months their TSH levels came down with the same T4 requirement as the non-celiac Hashimoto’s patients. Gluten…

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The hypothyroid athlete

Competitive athletes seem unlikely candidates for hypothyroidism, a disease that frequently causes fatigue, depression, and malaise. But some athletes are surprised to learn their dwindling performance and failure to build muscle stems from improperly managed hypothyroidism. The fact that athletes are typically fit and slender makes it easy for doctors to overlook their symptoms. And…

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